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Wow. - Walking on the Edge
I don't really have a plan...
foresthouse
foresthouse
Wow.
Even if I wasn't a gigantic fan of Terry Pratchett (which, of course, you all know I am), I would say here that EVERYONE should go and read his recent speech on Alzheimer's.

You can find it here.

Go. Read.

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Trixie feels: busy busy

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Comments
(Deleted comment)
foresthouse From: foresthouse Date: October 1st, 2008 07:45 pm (UTC) (current file)
Thanks for the heads-up - I did actually know about that one and watched it happen, but I always appreciate links to Terry news, because there's so much and I probably miss some. :)
virginia_belle From: virginia_belle Date: October 1st, 2008 05:33 pm (UTC) (current file)
Great speech. I already see the wave hitting here and all I see happening in response so far is a tightening of Medicaid rules to make it harder for people to access care.

B.
foresthouse From: foresthouse Date: October 1st, 2008 07:46 pm (UTC) (current file)
*sigh*

Yeah, it's not just a UK problem, which is why I think everyone should read that.
clockwork_zero From: clockwork_zero Date: October 1st, 2008 05:51 pm (UTC) (current file)
thanks for the link. I'd not been aware of Terry's condition and his speech was informative and moving.
foresthouse From: foresthouse Date: October 1st, 2008 07:47 pm (UTC) (current file)
I thought so too.
emmacmf From: emmacmf Date: October 1st, 2008 07:38 pm (UTC) (current file)
He is one amazing guy. That speech made me cry.

My Nan passed away three weeks ago this coming Friday. She was in the final stages of Advanced Alzheimer's, and I can honestly say that the last six months of her life have been disgustingly cruel to watch.

Everything that made her my lovely little Nan was slowly but surely stripped away, leaving her scared and violent and emotionally wrecked. My childhood memories are of a Nan who knitted and crocheted and baked; she wrote poems and danced and sang; she made dollshouse furniture with me and taught me how to knit. She was happy to lay on the floor and let her many grandchildren use her as a climbing frame, or, on one memorable occasion, let me turn her into a Christmas Tree.

It's hard to reconcile those memories with the Nan I just said goodbye to, who was leveled by a disease that left her in a hospital bed in her living room, doubly incontinent, frail, not knowing our names, only that she loved us (which was the one blessing). The Nan I used to know was gentle and sweet, and would have been mortified to know that when she reached the age of 81, she would be telling her carers to 'fuck off and leave her alone'.

We suspected that she was in the early stages of Alzheimers over fifteen years ago, but every doctor we spoke to said, nope, she's fine. Yeah, right. The diagnosis of Alzheimer's was finally made three months ago, and the fact that she was in the final stages just six weeks ago.

I never realised that Alzheimer's is a terminal disease until my Nan was diagnosed - I didn't know that, eventually, the person dies from it.

Something needs to be done, and I think Terry is going to be a driving force behind an upsurgence of increased awareness.

Sorry for rambling on there, but a lot of resentment has been stirred up in me. There's precious little support for sufferers and their carers; my mum almost worked herself into the ground caring for Nan these past few years, and it's just mental.

Go Terry.

Edited at 2008-10-01 07:50 pm (UTC)
foresthouse From: foresthouse Date: October 1st, 2008 07:50 pm (UTC) (current file)
Hey, rambling is ok, especially if it helps one vent. *hugs*

Alzheimer's is a very sad thing, and yes, terminal :( - the best hope we have is that with better funding for research and availability of things that help people combat it, those with it will be able to "be themselves" for much longer.

It's a tough, tough thing, and although I am of course NOT glad Terry has it, I AM glad he's speaking out so much about it.
emmacmf From: emmacmf Date: October 1st, 2008 07:54 pm (UTC) (current file)
Oh yes, venting helps! *hugs back*

Terry is making something positive out of his awful situation, and I really have so much admiration and respect for him as a human being, not just as a writer.

He's going to kick and fight this sodding awful disease every inch of the way, and if anybody is going to kick Alzheimer's arse, it'll be Terry Pratchett.
revid From: revid Date: October 1st, 2008 07:45 pm (UTC) (current file)
Very courageous man. Thanks for the link.
foresthouse From: foresthouse Date: October 1st, 2008 07:52 pm (UTC) (current file)
No problem. I think it's a great thing for all to read.
lady_of_mists From: lady_of_mists Date: October 1st, 2008 08:21 pm (UTC) (current file)
Alzheimer's is a very cruel disease. My Grandma's family had all volunteered to help them with research on it as they have just about all had it.

Unfortunately, at least two of her brothers (and possibly her mother) fell to the disease. It's heartwrenching to watch.
foresthouse From: foresthouse Date: October 2nd, 2008 04:37 pm (UTC) (current file)
It is really sad. :(

That's why I think it's so good for Alzheimer's sufferers that Terry is handling it the way he is - the more awareness people have, the more likely they'll be to donate to research or be aware of how to help people who have it.
addygryff From: addygryff Date: October 1st, 2008 08:37 pm (UTC) (current file)
Thanks for the link. That was a really impressive speech.
(Deleted comment)
insptr_penguin From: insptr_penguin Date: October 3rd, 2008 09:33 pm (UTC) (current file)

Even if I wasn't a gigantic fan of Terry Pratchett (which, of course, you all know I am)


What! Really? ;)
foresthouse From: foresthouse Date: October 6th, 2008 10:00 pm (UTC) (current file)
I KNOW, RIGHT? SHOCKER!!
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